Corporate parenting

Our Corporate Parenting Strategy aims to develop a clear commitment to Looked After Children and young people and to improve outcomes.  Our "Hear My Voice" event for young people provided an opportunity for them to engage us and identify the issues which they identified as their key priorities, specifically:

  • Leaving care and in care
  • Employment, Education and Training
  • Accommodation
  • Participation

Following the event, we created a Corporate Parenting Working group to implement our action plan and drive forward service improvement.

What is a Corporate Parent?

Corporate parenting means "the formal and local partnerships needed between all local authority departments and services, and associated agencies, who are responsible for working together to meet the needs of looked after children and young people, and care leavers."

It's not just a responsibility, but an opportunity for us to turn around and improve the life chances and outcomes for each and every one of our looked after children in Stirling.  It's an opportunity to make being in care a positive experience, and gives young people the care, stability and safety which every child deserves.

We have the responsibility as a corporate parent to all children and young people who are looked after in Stirling.  This responsibility may continue up to the age of 21 years (and sometimes beyond if they remain in education).

What are "Looked After" children and young people?

Looked after children refers to children and young people who are either:

  • living at home with birth parent(s) and/or other family members and who are subject to a supervision requirement made by a Children's hearing
  • children who are accommodated away from home, whether living with foster carers, kinship carers, in a private fostering arrangement, in residential homes, residential schools or secure units.

Children and young people may become looked after for a number of reasons, however most will have been affected by difficult experiences in their lives.  Many will have experienced abuse or neglect, and may present difficult and challenging behaviour.  Some may also have a disability, complex needs or may be affected by the illness or death of a parent.  In all cases, we will take a level of responsibility from birth parents, as it is deemed that the child/young person will be better cared for and safer as a result.

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